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Hyspecs Scratch Resistant Lenses

Hyspecs Scratch Resistant Lenses

Polycarbonate lenses are a popular choice for safety glasses due to their superior durability and resistance to impact. However, they can be scratched easily, which can impair vision and decrease the longevity of the lenses. To overcome this issue, coating layers can be applied to the lenses to enhance their scratch resistance.

The coating process begins by cleaning the lenses thoroughly to remove any dirt, dust, or other contaminants. The lenses are then dipped into a solution containing the coating materials, which can include silica or other abrasive particles. The coated lenses are then heated in an oven to thermally cure the coating, which causes the particles to fuse together and form a hard, scratch-resistant layer on the surface of the lenses.

This type of coating can significantly improve the scratch resistance of polycarbonate lenses, making them more durable and long-lasting. Additionally, the coating can also provide additional benefits such as improved UV protection and reduced glare, which can make the lenses more comfortable to wear and improve visual clarity.

However, it's important to note that while the coating can improve the scratch resistance of the lenses, it will not make them completely scratch-proof. Proper care and cleaning of the lenses is still necessary to ensure they maintain their scratch resistance and continue to provide clear vision.

 

Ranking Coating Methods

It is difficult to rank the coating methods by scratch resistant performance as it depends on the specific materials and techniques used for each method. However, in general, the methods that involve thermal curing and the use of abrasive particles tend to provide better scratch resistance than those that do not.

  1. Dip thermally cured coatings: This method involves immersing the lenses in a coating solution containing abrasive particles, which are then fused together by thermal curing to form a hard, scratch-resistant layer on the surface of the lenses.

  2. Spin coating with hard particles: Spin coating method with hard particles such as silica, that can create an even and thin layer, providing a good scratch resistance

  3. Flow coating with hard particles: Flow coating method with hard particles such as silica, that can also create an even and thin layer, providing a good scratch resistance

  4. Other coatings that does not involve thermal curing or abrasive particles, such as those that use chemical treatments, will likely provide less scratch resistance than the methods mentioned above.

It's important to note that even with the best coating method, the scratch resistance will never be 100% as it also depends on the quality and properties of the coating materials and the proper handling and maintenance of the lens.

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